PSA: There is a new trend about, and it’s here to stay for good

In recent years, sustainability regarding fashion has quickly moved to the forefront of many people’s minds when shopping for new clothes. Although fast fashion brands are still commonly used, there is now a huge focus on preventing exploitation of workers in the industry, as well as further damage to the environment. Due to this, how people shop for clothes has been completely transformed, resulting in more purchases of second-hand clothing or spending more money with sustainable brands.

However, something people may not have previously considered when trying to be more sustainable is the colours they are wearing. Trend forecasting website, WGSN, gather that new colour trends are very dependent on how sustainable the colours are. These are ‘conscious colours’, which consist of more neutral, earthy tones, alongside a few bolder, timeless shades. Some to mention are oat milk, powder blue, terracotta, and butter.

So many people are guilty of wanting to buy heaps of new clothes when a new season is upon us but with conscious colours, you no longer have to do that. These colours are thought to be classic and versatile, meaning that they will be suitable no matter the season or year. On top of that, earthy, neutral tones have always been a winner when it comes to fashion – being fitting at all times, whether it be for special occasions, casual wear, or work wear. The adaptivity of the conscious colours trend is just never-ending.

A huge difficulty individuals face when trying to become more sustainable with their fashion choices is the increased prices of many sustainable brands and a lot of people don’t have the available funds to spend extra on these clothes. Conscious colours allow people to be more sustainable in a more affordable way. Although the clothes themselves may not be made from the most sustainable materials, the longevity they will get from the timelessness of wearing conscious colours is a step in the right direction.

A huge difficulty individuals face when trying to become more sustainable with their fashion choices is the increased prices of many sustainable brands and a lot of people don’t have the available funds to spend extra on these clothes. Conscious colours allow people to be more sustainable in a more affordable way. Although the clothes themselves may not be made from the most sustainable materials, the longevity they will get from the timelessness of wearing conscious colours is a step in the right direction.

Popular colours in fashion have consistently changed, from a rise in the popularity of brown tones, to a comeback for neon shades. Therefore, it is inevitable that many brands will continue to create clothing based on trends which are likely to pass. But now, fast fashion clothing companies such as H&M and UNIQLO are putting efforts into allowing for greater sustainability in their work. This is mainly through being more conscious of how their production and materials are affecting the environment. However, it also appears that they are considering the use of conscious colours in their collections, which can be worn all year round and will not go out of fashion.

 

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A post shared by H&M (@hm)


Social media influencer, Molly Mae Hague, has been sporting conscious colours in her new collection with Pretty Little Thing. Alongside bolder colours of orange and green, many of the designs are made in sustainable colours, like the oat milk, butter, and tranquil blue shades displayed in the conscious colours trend.

 

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A post shared by Molly-Mae Hague (@mollymae)


What better way to spruce up your spring wardrobe than to use the conscious colours trend as your ultimate inspiration? Knowing you will be stylish for every season and helping push greater sustainability at the same time is something you will be proud of.

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